Tag: containers-in-production

How to Run GitLab in Rancher - Part 1

June 15, 2017

Note: This post is the first in a two-part series on using GitLab and Rancher together for continuous integration and deployment, and part two is now up. We’ve also made the entire walkthrough available for download

GitLab and RancherIntroduction

GitLab is, at its core, a tool for centrally managing Git repositories. As one might expect form a platform that provides this service, GitLab provides a robust authentication and authorization mechanism, groups, issue tracking, wiki, and snippets, along with public, internal, and private repositories.

GitLab goes further by including a powerful continuous integration (CI) engine and a Docker container registry, allowing you to go from development to release inside of the same utility. It continues by adding two more powerful open source software utilities:  Prometheus for monitoring, and Mattermost for team communication. The platform has a solid API and integrates with existing third-party systems like JIRA, Bugzilla, Pivotal, Slack, HipChat, Bamboo, and more.

All of this begs the question: why use GitLab instead of using SaaS services directly? The answer lies in personal taste. For most people, paying SaaS providers for the services that they provide is an excellent solution. You can focus on building your application and let them worry about maintaining the tools. What if you already have infrastructure with spare capacity? What if you just want private repositories without paying for that privilege? What if you did the math and determined that you can save money by hosting it yourself? What if you just want to own your own data?

Bringing services in-house opens you up to the risk of spending more time managing them and getting them to talk to each other, which is why GitLab truly shines as an option. With one click and a few minutes of configuration, you can be up and running with a complete solution.

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Securing a Containerized Instance of MongoDB

March 9, 2017

Securing MongoDBMongoDB, the popular open source NoSQL database, has been in the news a lot recently—and not for reasons that are good for MongoDB admins. Early this year, reports began appearing of MongoDB databases being “taken hostage” by attackers who delete all of the data stored inside the databases, then demand ransoms to restore it.

Security is always important, no matter which type of database you’re using. But the recent spate of MongoDB attacks makes it especially crucial to secure any MongoDB databases that you may use as part of your container stack.

This article explains what you need to know to keep MongoDB secure when it is running as a container. We’ll go over how to close the vulnerability behind the recent ransomware attacks using a MongoDB container while the container is running—as well as how to modify a MongoDB Dockerfile to change the default behavior permanently. Read more


Security for your Container Environment

January 26, 2017

As one of the most disruptive technologies in recent years, container-based applications are rapidly gaining traction as a platform on which to launch applications. But as with any new technology, the security of containers in all stages of the software lifecycle must be our highest priority. This post seeks to identify some of the inherent security challenges you’ll encounter with a container environment, and suggests base elements for a security plan to mitigate those vulnerabilities.

Benefits of a Container Environment and the Vulnerabilities They Expose

Before we investigate what aspects of your container infrastructure will need to be covered by your security plan, it would be wise to identify what potential security problems running applications in such an environment will present. The easiest way to do this is to contrast a typical virtual machine (VM) environment with that in use for a typical container-based architecture. Read more


Moving Containers to Production - A Short Checklist

January 10, 2017

containers to production checklistIf you’re anything like me, you’ve been watching the increasing growth of container-based solutions with considerable interest, and you’ve probably been experimenting with a couple of ideas. At some point in the future, perhaps you’d like to take those experiments and actually put them out there for people to use. Why wait? It’s a new year, and there is no time like the present to take some action on that goal.

Experimenting is great, and you learn a great deal, but often in the midst of trying out new things, hacking different technologies together and making it all work, things get introduced into our code which probably shouldn’t be put into a production environment. Sometimes, having a checklist to follow when we’re excited and nervous about deploying new applications out into the wild can help ensure that we don’t do things we shouldn’t. Consider this article as the start of a checklist to ready your Docker applications for prime time. Read more


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