Tag: rancher

New Machine Driver from cloud.ca!

May 24, 2017

Cloud.ca machine driverOne of the great benefits of the Rancher container management platform is that it runs on any infrastructure. While it’s possible to add any Linux machine as a host using our custom setup option, using one of the machine drivers in Rancher makes it especially easy to add and manage your infrastructure.

Today, we’re pleased to have a new machine driver available in Rancher, from our friends at cloud.ca. cloud.ca is a regional cloud IaaS for Canadian or foreign businesses requiring that all or some of their data remain in Canada, for reasons of compliance, performance, privacy or cost. The platform works as a standalone IaaS and can be combined with hybrid or multi-cloud services, allowing a mix of private cloud and other public cloud infrastructures such as Amazon Web Services. Having the cloud.ca driver available within Rancher makes it that much easier for our collective users to focus on building and running their applications, while minding data compliance requirements. Read more


[Press Release] Rancher Labs Named a "Cool Vendor" in Cloud Infrastructure by Gartner

May 17, 2017

Leading container management company recognized for innovation within cloud infrastructure industry

Cupertino, Calif. – May 17, 2017 – Rancher Labs, a provider of container management software, today announced they were recognized as one of four “Cool Vendors” in the May report by Gartner, Inc., Cool Vendors in Cloud Infrastructure, 2017.

“As container adoption continues to grow within the enterprise, the need for simplified container management persists,” said Sheng Liang, CEO and co-founder of Rancher Labs. “With Rancher, we’re providing a turnkey solution that enables organizations to deploy and manage containers in production, and on any choice of infrastructure. We’re thrilled to be named a “Cool Vendor” by Gartner and to be acknowledged for our innovation and execution in the cloud infrastructure space.” Read more


Running Serverless Applications on Rancher

May 11, 2017

One of the more novel concepts in systems design lately has been the notion of serverless architectures. It is no doubt a bit of hyperbole as there are certainly servers involved, but it does mean we get to think about servers differently.

 

The potential upside of serverless

Imagine a simple web based application that handles requests from HTTP clients. Instead of having some number of program runtimes waiting for a request to arrive, then invoking a function to handle them, what if we could start the runtime on-demand for each function as a needed and throw it away afterwards? We wouldn’t need to worry about the number of servers running that can accept connections, or deal with complex configuration management systems to build new instances of your application when you scale. Additionally, we’d reduce the chances of common issues with state management such as memory leaks, segmentation faults, etc.

Perhaps most importantly, this on-demand approach to function calls would allow us to scale every function to match the number of requests and process them in parallel. Every “customer” would get a dedicated process to handle their request, and the number of processes would only be limited by the compute capacity at your disposal. When coupled with a large cloud provider whose available, on-demand compute sufficiently exceeds your usage, serverless has the potential to remove a lot of the complexity around scaling your application.

Read more


The Case for Kubernetes

April 24, 2017

One of the first questions you are likely to come up against when deploying containers in production is the choice of orchestration framework.  While it may not be the right solution for everyone, Kubernetes is a popular scheduler that enjoys strong industry support.  In this short article, I’ll provide an overview of Kubernetes, explain how it is deployed with Rancher, and show some of the advantages of using Kubernetes for distributed multi-tier applications.

About Kubernetes

Kubernetes has an impressive heritage.  Spun-off as an open-source project in 2015, the technology on which Kubernetes is based (Google’s Borg system) has been managing containerized workloads at scale for over a decade.  While it’s young as open-source projects go, the underlying architecture is mature and proven.  The name Kubernetes derives from the Greek word for “helmsman” and is meant to be evocative of steering container-laden ships through choppy seas.  I won’t attempt to describe the architecture of Kubernetes here.  There are already some excellent posts on this topic including this informative article by Usman Ismail.

Like other orchestration solutions deployed with Rancher, Kubernetes deploys services comprised of Docker containers. Kubernetes evolved independently of Docker, so for those familiar with Docker and docker-compose, the Kubernetes management model will take a little getting used to. Kubernetes clusters are managed via a kubectl CLI or the Kubernetes Web UI (referred to as the Dashboard).  Applications and various services are defined to Kubernetes using JSON or YAML manifest files in a format that is different than docker-compose.  To make it easy for people familiar with Docker to get started with Kubernetes, a kubectl primer provides Kubernetes equivalents for the most commonly used Docker commands.

A Primer on Kubernetes Concepts

Kubernetes involves some new concepts that at first glance may seem confusing, but for multi-tier applications, the Kubernetes management model is elegant and powerful. Read more


[Press Release] Rancher Labs Partners with Docker to Embed Docker Enterprise Edition into Rancher Platform

April 18, 2017

Docker Enterprise Edition technology and support now available from Rancher Labs

Cupertino, Calif. – April 18, 2017 – Rancher Labs, a provider of container management software, today announced it has partnered with Docker to integrate Docker Enterprise Edition (Docker EE) Basic into its Rancher container management platform. Users will be able to access the usability, security and portability benefits of Docker EE through the easy to use Rancher interface. Docker provides a powerful combination of runtime with integrated orchestration, security and networking capabilities. Rancher provides users with easy access to these Docker EE capabilities, as well as the Rancher platform’s rich set of infrastructure services and other container orchestration tools. Users will now be able to purchase support for both Docker Enterprise Edition and the Rancher container management platform directly from Rancher Labs. Read more


Beyond Kubernetes Container Orchestration

March 23, 2017

If you’re going to successfully deploy containers in production, you need more than just container orchestration

Kubernetes is a valuable tool

Kubernetes is an open-source container orchestrator for deploying and managing containerized applications. Building on 15 years of experience running production workloads at Google, it provides the advantages inherent to containers, while enabling DevOps teams to build container-ready environments which are customized to their needs.

The Kubernetes architecture is comprised of loosely coupled components combined with a rich set of APIs, making Kubernetes well-suited for running highly distributed application architectures, including  microservices, monolithic web applications and batch applications.  In production, these applications typically span multiple containers across multiple server hosts, which are networked together to form a cluster.

Kubernetes provides the orchestration and management capabilities required to deploy containers for distributed application workloads. It enables users to build multi-container application services and schedule the containers across a cluster, as well as manage the health of the containers.  Because these operational tasks are automated, DevOps team can now do many of the same things that other application platforms enable them to do, but using containers.

But configuring and deploying Kubernetes can be hard

It’s commonly believed that Kubernetes is the key to successfully operationalizing containers at scale.  This may be true if you are running a single Kubernetes cluster in the cloud or have reasonably homogenous infrastructure. However, many organizations have a diverse application portfolio and user requirements, and therefore have more expansive and diverse needs. Read more