Using ros config, you can configure specific interfaces. Wildcard globbing is supported so eth* will match eth1 and eth2. The available options you can configure are address, gateway, mtu, and dhcp.

$ sudo ros config set rancher.network.interfaces.eth1.address 172.68.1.100/24
$ sudo ros config set rancher.network.interfaces.eth1.gateway 172.68.1.1
$ sudo ros config set rancher.network.interfaces.eth1.mtu 1500
$ sudo ros config set rancher.network.interfaces.eth1.dhcp false

If you wanted to configure the interfaces through the cloud config file, you’ll need to place interface configurations within the rancher key.

#cloud-config
rancher:
  network:
    interfaces:
      eth1:
        address: 172.68.1.100/24
        gateway: 172.68.1.1
        mtu: 1500
        dhcp: false

Note: The address item should be the CIDR format.

Multiple NICs

If you want to configure one of multiple network interfaces, you can specify the MAC address of the interface you want to configure.

Using ros config, you can specify the MAC address of the NIC you want to configure as follows:

$ sudo ros config set rancher.network.interfaces.”mac=ea:34:71:66:90:12:01”.dhcp true

Alternatively, you can place the MAC address selection in your cloud config file as follows:

#cloud-config
rancher:
  network:
    interfaces:
      "mac=ea:34:71:66:90:12:01":
         dhcp: true

NIC bonding

You can aggregate several network links into one virtual link for redundancy and increased throughput. For example:

#cloud-config
rancher:
  network:
    interfaces:
      bond0:
        addresses:
        - 192.168.101.33/31
        - 10.88.23.129/31
        gateway: 192.168.101.32
        bond_opts:
          downdelay: "200"
          lacp_rate: "1"
          miimon: "100"
          mode: "4"
          updelay: "200"
          xmit_hash_policy: layer3+4
        post_up:
        - ip route add 10.0.0.0/8 via 10.88.23.128
      mac=0c:c4:d7:b2:14:d2:
        bond: bond0
      mac=0c:c4:d7:b2:14:d3:
        bond: bond0

In this example two physical NICs (with MACs 0c:c4:d7:b2:14:d2 and 0c:c4:d7:b2:14:d3) are aggregated into a virtual one bond0.

During the bootup process, RancherOS runs cloud-init. It automatically detects the data sources of cloud-init, but sometimes a data source requires a network connection. By default, in cloud-init, we open rancher.network.interfaces.eth*.dhcp=true, which may affect the bonding NIC. If you do not require the network connection for your data-source, use rancher.network.interfaces.eth*.dhcp=false in the kernel cmdline to disable DHCP for all NICs.

VLANS

In this example, you can create an interface eth0.100 which is tied to VLAN 100 and an interface foobar that will be tied to VLAN 200.

#cloud-config
rancher:
  network:
    interfaces:
      eth0:
        vlans: 100,200:foobar

Bridging

In this example, you can create a bridge interface.

#cloud-config
rancher:
  network:
    interfaces:
      br0:
        bridge: true
        dhcp: true
      eth0:
        bridge: br0

Run custom network configuration commands

Available as of v1.1

You can configure pre and post network configuration commands to run in the network service container by adding pre_cmds and post_cmds array keys to rancher.network, or pre_up andpost_up keys for specific rancher.network.interfaces.

For example:

#cloud-config
write_files:
  - container: network
    path: /var/lib/iptables/rules.sh
    permissions: "0755"
    owner: root:root
    content: |
      #!/bin/bash
      set -ex
      echo $@ >> /var/log/net.log
      # the last line of the file needs to be a blank line or a comment
rancher:
  network:
    dns:
      nameservers:
        - 8.8.4.4
        - 4.2.2.3
    pre_cmds:
    - /var/lib/iptables/rules.sh pre_cmds
    post_cmds:
    - /var/lib/iptables/rules.sh post_cmds
    interfaces:
      lo:
        pre_up:
        - /var/lib/iptables/rules.sh pre_up lo
        post_up:
        - /var/lib/iptables/rules.sh post_up lo
      eth0:
        pre_up:
        - /var/lib/iptables/rules.sh pre_up eth0
        post_up:
        - /var/lib/iptables/rules.sh post_up eth0
      eth1:
        dhcp: true
        pre_up:
        - /var/lib/iptables/rules.sh pre_up eth1
        post_up:
        - /var/lib/iptables/rules.sh post_up eth1
      eth2:
        address: 192.168.3.13/16
        mtu: 1450
        pre_up:
        - /var/lib/iptables/rules.sh pre_up eth2
        post_up:
        - /var/lib/iptables/rules.sh post_up eth2

WiFi

Available as of v1.5

In order to enable WiFi access, update the cloud-config with the WiFi network information. You can use DHCP or STATIC mode.

Example of a wireless adapter using DHCP

#cloud-config
rancher:
  network:
    interfaces:
      wlan0:
        wifi_network: network1
    wifi_networks:
      network1:
        ssid: "Your wifi ssid"
        psk: "Your wifi password"
        scan_ssid: 1

Example of a wireless adapter using STATIC

rancher:
  network:
    dns:
      nameservers:
      - 8.8.8.8
      - 8.8.4.4
    interfaces:
      wlan0:
        wifi_network: network1
    wifi_networks:
      network1:
        ssid: "Your wifi ssid"
        psk: "Your wifi password"
        scan_ssid: 1
        address: 192.168.1.78/24
        gateway: 192.168.1.1

Example using two wireless adapters with DHCP

rancher:
  network:
    interfaces:
      wlan0:
        wifi_network: network1
      wlan1:
        wifi_network: network2
    wifi_networks:
      network1:
        ssid: "Your wifi ssid"
        psk: "Your wifi password"
        scan_ssid: 1
      network2:
        ssid: "Your wifi ssid"
        psk: "Your wifi password"
        scan_ssid: 1

When adding in WiFi access, you do not need a system reboot, you only need to restart the network service in System Docker.

$ sudo system-docker restart network

Note: For Intel wireless adapters, there are some built-in firmware and modules, which prevents requiring to install any new modules or firmware. For other adapters, you may need to install additional os kernel-extras.

4G-LTE

Available as of v1.5

In order to support 4G-LTE, 4G-LTE module will need to be connected to the motherboard and to get a good signal, an external atenna will need to be added. You can assemble such a device, which supports USB interface and SIM cards slot:

In order to use RancherOS, you will need to use the ISO built for 4G-LTE support. This ISO has a built-in modem-manager service and is available with each release.

After booting the ISO, there will be a 4G NIC, such as wwan0. Use the following cloud-config to set the APN parameter.

rancher:
  network:
    modem_networks:
      wwan0:
        apn: xxx

After any configuration changes, restart the modem-manager service to apply these changes.

$ sudo system-docker restart modem-manager

Note: Currently, RancherOS has some built-in rules in udev rules to allow RancherOS to recognize specific 4G devices, but there are additional vendors that may be missing. If you need to add these in, please file an issue.