Tag: rancher

Terraforming Rancher Deployments on Digital Ocean

November 6, 2017

Having a cool deployment system is pretty neat, but one thing every engineer learns one way or another is that manual processes aren’t processes, they’re chores. If you have to do something more than once, you should automate it if you can. Of course, if the task of automating the process takes longer than the total projected time you’ll spend executing the process, you shouldn’t automate it. Read more


Create Rancher Environments with Ansible

October 4, 2017

Attention, Ansible users! We’ve released the first version of our Ansible playbooks for Rancher. Ansible is a configuration management system that allows you to write instruction manuals it uses to manage local and remote systems. These playbooks give full control over the installation and configuration of Rancher server and agent nodes, with features that include:
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Kubernetes Authentication in Rancher and RBAC

September 22, 2017

As of version 1.6.3, Rancher introduced the Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) feature in Kubernetes. This feature allows admins to configure different policies that allow or deny access for users and service accounts to Kubernetes API resources.

To better understand how the RBAC feature works, this post will shed light on how authentication works with the Kubernetes API, and how the RBAC authorization module works with authenticated users. Read more


Winning Hackathons, DevOps-Style!

August 3, 2017

Recently, I moved to New York City. As a new resident, I decided to take part in the NYC DeveloperWeek hackathon, where our team won the NetApp challenge. In this post, I’ll walk through the product we put together, and share how we built a CI/CD pipeline for quick, iterative product development under tight constraints.

The Problem: Have you ever lived or worked in a building where it’s a pain to configure the buzzer to forward to multiple roommates or coworkers? Imagine that a friend arrives and buzzes your number, which is set to forward to your roommate who is visiting South Africa, and has no cell service. If you’re running late, your friend is just stuck outside.

The Product: We built a PBX-style application that integrations with Zang, and forwards a buzzer to multiple numbers, and even allows your friend to use a PIN on his phone to gain entry.

The constraint: For the hackathon, we had to use hardware that had already been setup and allocated.

 

Building our Hackathon CI/CD Pipeline

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For the competition, we knew that we wanted our builds scalable from the start, and that each deployment would snapshot our entire data environment pre-deployment using NetApp ONTAP (a sponsor of the Hackathon, and a really nice group of folks); if any deployment had an issue, we could simply and quickly roll back.

Fortunately, I am a firm believer in building stateless, Docker container-ready, rebuildable architecture; I can’t go back to the world that existed before: no real CI/CD, lots of SSH-ing into other systems, or SCP-ing data from one place to another. Thankfully, today we have tools and strategies that can help us.

Here’s what we used: Read more


Setting up Traefik as a Dynamically-Configured Proxy and Load-Balancer

July 12, 2017

When deploying applications in the container world, one of the less obvious points is how to make the application available to the external world, outside of the container cluster. One option is to use the host port, which basically maps one port of the host to the container port where the application is exposed. While this option is fine for local development, it is not viable in a real cluster with many applications deployed. One solution is to use an HTTP proxy/load balancer. This container will be exposed using standard HTTP/HTTPS ports on the host, and will route traffic to the application running as a container.

In this post, we will setup Traefik as an HTTP proxy / load balancer for web services running in a Rancher Cattle setup. Traefik will dynamically update its configuration using the Rancher API. An SSL wildcard cert will be used. The (nice) Let’s Encrypt ACME feature Traefik is offering will not be used here. We will make use of Rancher secret feature. If you plan to use Traefik with Let’s Encrypt SSL certs, I encourage you to use the Traefik stack available in Rancher Community Catalog.

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