Storage

Saiyam Pathak
Saiyam Pathak
Gray Calendar Icon August 24, 2020
A Gray Icon of a Clock with White Clock Hands Read time: 5 min

Learn how to update K3s, the lightweight Kubernetes distribution for edge computing, with a new open source project called System Upgrade Controller.

Sheng Yang
Sheng Yang
Gray Calendar Icon October 11, 2018
A Gray Icon of a Clock with White Clock Hands Read time: 11 min

Thoughts on Kubernetes design choices, complexity, and usability

Jan Bruder
Jan Bruder
Gray Calendar Icon September 24, 2018
A Gray Icon of a Clock with White Clock Hands Read time: 5 min

A look at some of the highlights in the upcoming Kubernetes 1.12 release.

James Oliver
James Oliver
Gray Calendar Icon May 29, 2018
A Gray Icon of a Clock with White Clock Hands Read time: 5 min

Live migration of virtual machines is now supported by RancherVM. Learn how to setup shared storage and run VM migration to different hosts.

Gray Calendar Icon August 3, 2017
A Gray Icon of a Clock with White Clock Hands Read time: 4 min

Recently, I moved to New York City. As a new resident, I decided to take part in the NYC DeveloperWeek hackathon, where our team won the NetApp challenge. In this post, I’ll walk through the product we put together, and share how we built a CI/CD pipeline for quick, iterative product development under tight constraints. The Problem: Have you ever lived or worked in a building where it’s a pain to configure the buzzer to forward to multiple roommates or coworkers?

Gray Calendar Icon August 18, 2016
A Gray Icon of a Clock with White Clock Hands Read time: 6 min

Introduction If you have been working with Docker for any length of time, you probably already know that shared volumes and data access across hosts is a tough problem. While the Docker ecosystem is maturing, implementing persistent storage across environments still seems to be a problem for most folks. Luckily, Rancher has been working on this problem and come up with a unique solution that addresses most of these issues.

Gray Calendar Icon September 22, 2015
A Gray Icon of a Clock with White Clock Hands Read time: 5 min

We just released Convoy v0.3 last week, and I’m excited to announce that it now supports Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) as a Convoy driver. With this release you can now create persistent Docker volumes on AWS, backed with all the performance and features of EBS. With this new feature, when users create a Convoy volume using the EBS driver, Convoy will create an EBS volume, attach it to the current running instance, and then assign it to the Docker container.

Gray Calendar Icon September 9, 2015
A Gray Icon of a Clock with White Clock Hands Read time: 5 min

The latest release of Docker Engine now supports volume plugins, which allow users to extend Docker capabilities by adding solutions that can create and manage data volumes for containers that need to manage and operate on persistent datasets.This is especially important for databases, and addresses one of the key limitations in Docker. Recently at Rancher we released Convoy, an open-source Docker volume driver that makes it simple to snapshot, backup, restore Docker volumes across clouds.

Gray Calendar Icon May 21, 2015
A Gray Icon of a Clock with White Clock Hands Read time: 6 min

Note: Rancher has come a long way since this was first published in June 2015. We’ve revised this post (as of August 2016) to reflect the updates in our enterprise container management service. Read on for the updated tutorial! Rancher supports multiple orchestration engines for its managed environments, including Kubernetes, Mesos, Docker Swarm, and Cattle (the default Rancher managed environment). The Cattle environment is rich with features like stacks, services, and load balancing, and in this post, we’ll highlight common uses for these features.

Gray Calendar Icon November 20, 2014
A Gray Icon of a Clock with White Clock Hands Read time: 3 min

Last week we introduced our new project, Rancher.io, at AWS Re:Invent, and it was amazing. We’d been working on the software for months, talking with good friends, old customers and former colleagues about what we were building and wondering how it would be received by users. We were anxious to share it with new people and eager to get their feedback. We were also really nervous. Four of us flew out to Vegas, set up our little booth, tested our demos and organized our piles of stickers and t-shirts.

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